Tips To Install Ceiling Fans Installation

How to Install Ceiling Fans

Connect the switch

Check and reset (if necessary) the code toggles on the wall-mounted electronic switch to match the ones on the receiver. Remove the existing wall switch and connect the two black wires on the new switch to the ones that were connected to the old switch with wire connectors. Screw the switch into the box and install the cover plate.

Connect the light pod and radio receiver

Place the radio receiver into the switch housing/light pod assembly and connect the light pod wires according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Note the settings on the receiver’s code toggles so you can dial in the same settings on the electronic controls at the wall switch. Now loosen the screws in the switch-housing hub halfway. Plug the motor ceiling fan wiring into the receptacle on the receiver and twist the switch housing into place on the hub. Retighten the screws.

Attach the fan blades

Screw the fan blades to their brackets and screw the brackets to the bottom of the motor. It’s easiest to hold the screw in the bracket with the screwdriver while you lift the blade assembly into position. Then drive the screw in.

Wire the fan, fan light and switch

This is what you need to know about ceiling fan wire colors: Connect the bare ground wire from the box to the green ground wire on the bracket with a wire connector. Connect the white neutral wire from the motor to the neutral wire from the box. Connect the blue and black wire from the motor to the black hot wire from the box and neatly fold them into the box.

Hang the motor

Lift the assembly over the open side of the bracket and lower it into place. Rotate the motor until the ball slot locks into place over the tab on the bracket. Your fan will include assembly instructions. Photos 6 – 9 will help you with several key steps.

 

How to Install a Ceiling Fan

Test Your Ceiling Fan Installation

Turn the circuit breaker on again. Return to the ceiling fan and test it.

Attach the Light Bulbs and Shade

If your ceiling fan includes a light component, conclude your installation by adding the light bulbs and the light shade.

Attach the Ceiling Fan Blades

Your ceiling fan blades may come in two parts: a mount and the blade. The mount is the metal section that attaches the blade to the fan motor assembly. Attach the blade to the mount, then attach both to the ceiling fan. Be precise with this step since any deviation may cause the fan blades to wobble.

Attach the Fan Canopy

Slide the fan canopy upward and screw it into place with the decorative screws from the kit.

Make the Electrical Connections

Consult the ceiling fan’s instructions for wiring details specific to your fan. Hire an electrician at this point if you feel uncomfortable with this procedure. Expose wire ends with a wire stripper and twist them together with the wire nuts typically included in ceiling fan kits.

 

How to Install a Ceiling Fan

Ceiling Fan Overview

There are few fixtures that can impact the look and livability of a room as much as a ceiling fan. It can keep you cool on sultry summer days, push warm air down into the room during winter, and even serve as the room’s primary illumination if you add a light. The best news: Replacing an existing light fixture with a fan is a simple, one-day task since the wiring is already in place.

Remove the Existing Light Fixture

Make sure electricity to circuit is turned off and carefully remove the glass shade or globe from the old light fixture.

Unscrew the retaining nut or screws that hold the fixture to the ceiling.

Remove Box and Cut New Hole

Remove the old electrical box from the ceiling. If it’s nailed to a joist, pry it free with a flat bar. If it’s suspended from a bar, you may have to take off a metal plate to unscrew the box; then pry the bar from the joists.

Attach New Electrical Box

Feed the electrical cable coming from the ceiling through the knockout hole in the pancake box. (Be sure there’s a cable connector attached to the knockout hole.)

Set the box into the hole cut through the ceiling and press it tight against the underside of the joist.

Attach the box to the joist with the two 1 1/2-inch No. 10 hex-head screws provided. Drive in the screws with a drill/driver equipped with a 5/16-inch nut-driver tip.

Glue on the Ceiling Medallion

Apply a small bead of urethane-based adhesive to the back of the ceiling medallion.

Pass the wires through the medallion (above).

Center the medallion on the pancake box and press. Fasten it with four 6d finishing nails driven into the joist.

Set the nailheads and fill with caulk or spackle.

 

Our New Ceiling Fan and Tips to Install your Own

Get Ready to Drop Things

I can’t even tell you the number of times I dropped a tiny screw or wire cap while doing this project. When you’re up on the ladder trying desperately to screw things in, you’re bound to drop things. So just know that it’s totally normal & okay.

I did get pretty frustrated with this project, and I want you to learn from me and ease up a bit. All I wanted was for this dang fan to be installed, and the small setbacks of dropping items really made my blood boil. But that meant that I was tenser when screwing things in and wasn’t 100% paying attention..which resulted in more mistakes. Instead, take a breath and keep moving forward. You got this!

Invest in a Wire Cutter

My toolbox didn’t have a wire cutter, but I ended up purchasing one for this project. This is a must as you’ll have to shorten lots of the wires from the fan to connect to the ceiling wires. So be sure to pick one up from the store before you get started!

First, Read The Directions Completely

I often like to dive right into a project and figure it out as I go. But this is not the time to be doing that. Instead, read the directions that come with your fan completely from start to finish before you even get going. This will save you a lost of time & frustration later on #trustme

Layout All the Parts

Make sure you get out ALL of your supplies before you get started. Open the box and layout all of the supplies neatly, and be sure to have all of your DIY tools on-hand too (including a flashlight!) We made the mistake of putting out the supplies on our kitchen island, instead of near us in the back where we were doing the project. This resulted in a lot of back and forth from the kitchen to the bedroom. Learn from our mistake and keep all supplies nearby and neat!

Enlist a Buddy

When it comes to DIY projects like this one, I often prefer to work alone (or sometimes with Bridget). However, this is definitely a 2-person job. You may need someone to hold the old fan while you disconnect the wires, you’ll need a helper to hand you things while you’re up high on the ladder, and you’ll want a buddy to help you lift up the new heavy fan to the ceiling.

 

Ceiling Fan Installation Tips

Installing a Ceiling Fan

When wiring up a fan in a new home, the standard, code-compliant electrical supply for a light fixture works adequately. When using an existing service in an older home, make sure your ceiling box has a grounded electrical supply of 120 volts AC, 60 hertz, on a 15 ampere circuit. In either case, your ceiling outlet must be rated “for ceiling fan use” and attach to your framing firmly enough to support 50 pounds.

It’s always best to install electrical boxes before doing any wiring so that you can cut your cables to exact length. I like to start at the ceiling with a 4″ octagonal metal box. Metal boxes install easily with a screw gun and cost less than the plastic boxes designed for ceiling fan use. In new construction, where the framing is exposed and readily accessible, I cut a length of 2″ x 6″ mounting block to fit snugly between ceiling joists, providing a stable support to attach my outlet. I find it easier to attach the mounting block by using a battery-powered screw gun rather than nails. A set of three 3″ screws driven through each joist into either end of the block provides adequate support.

When setting your mounting block, remember to recess it far enough from the edge of your ceiling framing to allow for the depth of a junction-box and plaster ring. In a standard assembly, using a 2″ deep box behind 1/2″ drywall, the mounting block should be set 1 1/2″ back from the edge of the joists. I attach my metal ceiling box to the backing block with two 1/2″ long number 10 tapping screws.

Sometimes you have to set your ceiling box right under a joist. The standard 1 1/2″ framing members don’t provide enough bearing for a safe and stable fan installation, so you’ll need to “sister” a 2″ x 4″ block along the length of the framing member where your fan will hang; then attach a 1″ “shallow” box. This box won’t allow much room to tuck wires when you mount the fixture, but there’s always a little extra space in the canopy. Whether using a standard or shallow box, don’t forget to remove one of the 1/2″ knockouts and attach a 3/8″ romex connector to it before screwing the box in place. It’s a pain to do it later. I like to use metal connectors because you can loosen them easily and move a cable when needed. Once your cable’s locked in a plastic connector you’ve got to destroy the connector to move it.